Propery Tax Scam - Long Beach Homeowners Beware

Propery Tax Scam - Long Beach Homeowners Beware



Property Tax Scam - Long Beach Homeowners Beware

 

The Los Angeles County Office of the Assessor has made an important announcement


If you receive mail from private companies offering to pursue a reduction in your property taxes for a hefty fee please contact the Los Angeles County Department of Consumer Affairs by phone at (800) 973-3370 or visit their website.


There is no reason to pay for a review that has been done for free.


 

Property owners should be aware that their property may be included in a review the Assessor's Office has done for 2009. The review included single-family homes and condominiums purchased between July 1, 2003 and June 30, 2008. In some particularly hard hit areas of the county, the review included properties purchased as far back as 2000. 473,000 properties were reviewed, resulting in lower assessments on 333,000 homes and condos. Please click here to see if your property has been reviewed for a decline-in-value.


All 473,000 owners whose property was included in the proactive review will be notified of the results in writing by the end of June. Owners who disagree with the results of the review or were not included in the review, may file an application through December 31. The Decline-In-Value form is simple to complete and readily available online or at one of the Assessor's District Offices. We will review the application and if a reduction is warranted, the taxable value will be reduced. Please note that there is no charge for a review. Owners are urged to wait until July to decide whether to file an application.


 

 


Read Also:

 

 

 

 



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Posted on June 24, 2009 16:07:24 by Laurie Manny Professional Group
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Property Tax Relief for Long Beach and Los Angeles County Homeowners? Not Without An Appraisal

Property Tax Relief for Los Angeles County Homeowners? Not Without An Appraisal - The Los Angeles County assessor's office on Monday announced completion of their automatic




Property Tax Relief for Long Beach and Los Angeles County Homeowners?

Not Without An Appraisal

 

 

The Los Angeles County assessor's office on Monday announced completion of their automatic "decline-in-value" reassessments that reviewed 473,000 homes purchased between July 1, 2003 and June 30, 2008. This review resulted in 330,000 county residences qualifying for automatic reductions in their October 2009 tax bill.


Homeowners with qualifying properties will be notified of the results in writing by June 30. Those who were not reviewed can file for free with the Assessor's Office until December 31.


According to the assessor, the average reduction in assessed values for single-family residences was $126,000, for an average tax savings of $1,400 per year. Condos saw averaged reductions of $96,000, for savings of about $1,100 per year.


Just how generous the savings will be on an individual basis is hard to say. Presumably, homeowners that purchased between 2005 - 2007 will see the bulk of the savings, while others may not see as large a reduction. But with budgets on the brink throughout the State, should anyone should expect assessor largesse?


Not without your own appraisal.


Two reasons:


  1. The assessor's automatic valuation used market data in 2008-pre January 1 2009 cut-off.
  2. Homeowners applying for review can submit their own appraisal with sales data through March 31, 2009.  

If you've been watching the news, you know prices continued sliding into this year. So homeowners accepting their auto-assessment might not be maximizing the savings they otherwise could see.


In two recent tax-reduction cases, the homeowners handed me their reduced-assessment notices sent to them by the assessor. Both assessments were --- get this --- high by about $150,000. (Which explains why they called me to begin with.) If either case reflects at all the data the assessor's using to calculate 2009 taxes, you want to get a second opinion.


To know if you property was reviewed, click here. If your property was not reviewed, or you didn't qualify even though you bought your home between June 30, 2003 and July 1, 2008, download a copy of the Decline-in-Value Reassessment Application then call for us a consultation-it's free.


PS. You want to get your options out of the way quickly, the deadline to file an appeal with the Assessment Appeals Board is November 30.

 

Los Angeles County Tax Assessors Office
500 West Temple Street Room 286
Los Angeles, CA  90012
Rick Auerbach, Assessor
213-974-3211
assessor.lacounty.gov

 


Also see: LA Times: Property tax relief coming for more than 330,000 L.A. County homeowners



Read Also:

Property Tax Reassessments in Long Beach & Southern California

 

 

 



http://www.longbeachrealestatehome.com/009824

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Laurie Manny

Long Beach Realtor®

(562) 212-5420

244 Redondo Avenue
Belmont Heights
Long Beach, California 90803

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  • Condos
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Posted on June 05, 2009 16:24:38 by Laurie Manny Professional Group
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Appraising Downtown Long Beach in 2008

Appraising Downtown Long Beach in 2008-Absorbtion Rate



LONG BEACH REAL ESTATE

 Downtown Long Beach Lighthouse - Rainbow Harbor

 

Appraising Downtown Long Beach in 2008 

 

 
 

Downtown Long Beach as well as many major cities in Southern California will be faced with a common question in 2008. "Are we in a declining market?" The answer matters if you're thinking about buying, selling or refinancing Downtown Long Beach real estate this year.

If you've been listening to the news lately, you probably heard that Nationally we have between 8 and 9 months of housing inventory. So what does this mean to Long Beach residents exactly?

Absolutely nothing...

What the news alludes to are Absorption Rates on a national level. But real estate is local. Hence, real estate absorption rate locally is what matter.
What are Absorption Rates?

 
In short, an absorption rate is rate in which existing listing inventory is being purchased or absorbed by buyers. Absorption Rate Analysis is the statistical means to measure these supply/demand characteristics of an area. It's a simple division problem with two basic variables.

  1. number of listings
  2. number of sales


These variables can be defined in a number of ways that allow real estate appraisers and Realtors® to view the market from different vantage points. Here we'll approach it in the way that Federal Regulators appear to want to see it done.

First, the listings and sales under analysis have to be of "like-kind" as the property in question (a.k.a. subject property), and they have to be in the same neighborhood.

If the subject is a 1920's Craftsman, 1500 SF in size on a 5,000 SF lot in Downtown Long Beach - appraisers will probably research "like-kind" sales and listings that range between 1200 and 1800 SF in size, built up to 1940 or so. Lot sizes will vary so we won't typically stress too much on that unless the area known premiums for specialty uses exist that result from size (i.e. equestrian/horse zoning...not very likely in Downtown Long Beach).

Then, we'll find all available listings within the neighborhood that meet the criteria. For illustration sake we'll assume we found 21 listings.

We then research closed sales in the past 12 months, in the same neighborhood, with the same criteria. Let's say our research yields 36 closed sales.

We then divide 36 closed sales by 12 months which gives us a monthly absorption rate of 3 sales per month.

Finally, we divide the 21 listings by the absorption rate of 3 sales per month, and this yields an inventory factor of 7 months. That is to say, there is 7 months of inventory of like properties in the subject neighborhood.


 
Why does this matter?


As a general rule of thumb -- when the absorption factor is greater than 6 months, banks consider there to be an "over-supply" of homes. That is, there are more sellers than buyers in the marketplace hence you've heard the term "buyer's market". When the factor is below 4 months, it's generally considered a "seller's market" because there isn't enough supply for the amount of buyers. The happy medium for most banks is between 5-6 months supply but of course, less than that is great too because the house they collateralized with the loan is probably appreciating in value. This reduces the banks exposure because there is equity growing in the property. This effectively lowers the ratio between the loan amount and the value of the home over time. Who willingly walks away from home equity, right?


So what happens when inventory balloons past 6 months?

A few things happen. Price reductions on listings tend to occur to attract buyers. Sometimes -- depending on the market -- the reductions can be extreme thereby deflating values of surrounding properties. The reason this is a big issue to banks is that, if inventory grows to the point that reductions are undercutting the value of the collateral they used to give you the loan (your house), then they risk over-exposing themselves and their investors.

So let's assume you qualified for a 100% loan for a purchase -- and the property is in a "declining market" with excess inventory -- the bank in theory is loaning more than 100% of the property value. Since no one can predict how long excess inventory will last, banks will often curtail some of that risk by reducing the maximum financing allowable under the loan program you qualified for. (Speak to a reputable mortgage advisor on this issue for clarification).


How does this effect appraisals outcomes in 2008?

Banks already are demanding an even higher level of scrutiny of absorption rates from appraisers. Banks are also demanding higher quality valuations in general to secure their interests and that of their investors. This may be prudent if we consider the fact that if banks suffer too many losses -- we may find ourselves paying cash for our next house. While market transition from previous highs of years earlier, this means that more often than not appraisers will likely find excess inventory in most markets and have to report it to the banks. This is done in the appraisal report when appraisers check "declining markets" in the neighborhood analysis.

If and when banks asks for an additional 5 percent down on your next purchase because of excessive inventory, don't be surprised and just remember that for that little extra the bank may exposing itself by 100% to 120% of the value of the property in the years to come. Not a bad deal if we look at it this way. 


How do you get Absorption Rate information if you're thinking about buying or selling?

Call Laurie Manny. No one knows Long Beach better than Laurie.

Read also:  Insights about Valuation and Social Psychology - The Appraisal Process



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Main Street Realtors Long Beach - Laurie Manny - Long Beach 
Realtor   

Laurie Manny

Long Beach Realtor®

(562) 212-5420

244 Redondo Avenue
Belmont Heights
Long Beach, California 90803

  • Buyers/Sellers/Investors
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  • Condos
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Posted on January 05, 2008 14:18:27 by Laurie Manny Professional Group
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Property Tax Reassessments in Long Beach & Southern California

Property Tax Reassessments in Long Beach & Southern California-Apply for yours ASAP



 

Property Tax ReassessmentOwners of Long Beach Real Estate and other Southern California Real Estate need to contact the County Tax Assessors office as soon as possible to have your homes and condos, as well as any other real estate holdings, reassessed to todays new market values and have their property tax liability reduced. Currently property taxes are based on .125% of purchase price and are then adjusted over time, based on assessed value.


 

Recently consumers have been inquiring "When will our property taxes be reassessed to the new and lower market values?" Well that is an excellent question and one that was recently addressed in an article in the NY Times, 'Taxes Are Reassessed in Housing Slump'. The article states:

 

 

"in 2007 roughly 1,800 homeowners asked for reassessments
in Los Angeles County, far above the average of about 500,
yet far below the tens of thousands of homeowners inLos
Angeles who looked for tax adjustments during someyears
of the downturn in the 1990s."


 

1,800 homeowners is a small fraction of the residents of the Southern California and Long Beach Communities. Reduce your tax liability, contact the Los Angeles County Tax Assessors office as soon as possible to begin the process.

 

In 1978, California voters passed Proposition 8, a constitutional amendment that allows a temporary reduction in assessed value when a property suffers a decline-in-value. Information on Proposition 8 can be found here.

 

 

If you disagree with the assessed value of your property, you should contact the Assessors Office to request a review of the value. If the matter is not resolved to your satisfaction, you may then file an appeal with the Assessment Appeals Board.

 

Updated June 5, 2009:  Tax Relief for Long Beach and Los Angeles County Homeowners


 

Links to other relevent Government Sites:

 

 

 



http://www.longbeachrealestatehome.com/009087

Main Street Realtors Long Beach - Laurie Manny - Long Beach 
Realtor   

Laurie Manny

Long Beach Realtor®

(562) 212-5420

244 Redondo Avenue
Belmont Heights
Long Beach, California 90803

  • Buyers/Sellers/Investors
  • Homes
  • Condos
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  • 1031 Exchanges
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4161 Hathaway 46 Long Beach CA-Circle Area Condo - SOLD - I can sell YOURS too!

Long Beach Real Estate Search Engine Marketing Specialist - Laurie Manny 562-212-5420

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Posted on December 25, 2007 03:09:28 by Laurie Manny Professional Group
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Long Beach Real Estate-Insights about Valuation and Social Psychology-The Appraisal Process

Long Beach Real Estate-Insights about Valuation and Social Psychology-The Appraisal Process



Insights into the Appraisal Process

Realizing that the appraisal process is a complete enigma to most sellers and buyers of Long Beach Homes and Condos, we asked one of our top appraisers to write an article for the Long Beach Homeowners describing the appraisal process.  He has exceeded our expectations.  

 

To most people, real estate appraisal is a rather obscure field. Thats because appraisal is mostly a business-to-business profession where clients of appraisers are usually banks, attorneys or other professional organizations - rarely homeowners. I was invited by Laurie to connect with thousands of her loyal visitors to shed light into the world of appraisers, breakdown common misconceptions revolving this illusive industry and share my personal insights about the Long Beach real estate market. Through a series of exclusive articles here on LBREH, Ill attempt to do so in plain language.

 

To start, real estate appraisers occupy paradoxical strata in the real estate food chain. That is, were the least paid of all facilitators in a finance transaction, yet were the independent enablers that enrich the lives of the star players (agents, brokers, buyers, sellers). When framed this way, it appears that being the noble body of honesty and integrity totally blows. But it doesnt, its truly a great profession and highly lucrative once you understand it.

 

So lets take it one step at a time.

 

First, appraisers are required to adhere to very strict standards of ethics and professional practice. The reason appraisers work for flat, generally modest fees - especially in mortgage transactions - is so that there is no collusion or inducement to 'hit a number'.  Could holding the 'payment carrot' at the end of stick sway a persons better judgment?  Sure it can.  Thats why appraiser payment should always be upfront at a fixed rate, regardless of value or the outcome of the transaction.  A real life testament to this practice is in the case of mortgage fraud investigations.

 

As the Southern California market unravels, major lenders that issued home loans in the advent of the credit bubble are digging deep to find inappropriate activity. The first and most critical component of any mortgage fraud investigation is the appraisal. The slightest indication of collusion or inducement can trigger full blown audits (file investigation) since the size of the Long Beach home loans were predicated mostly by the appraised value of the Long Beach property. This is why when applying for your next home loan - make sure to get payment out of the way during the site inspection. This way, the appraiser remits a 'paid invoice' for your broker/lender. While Im a benefactor to this advice, this will help alleviate any appearance of



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Main Street Realtors Long Beach - Laurie Manny - Long Beach 
Realtor   

Laurie Manny

Long Beach Realtor®

(562) 212-5420

244 Redondo Avenue
Belmont Heights
Long Beach, California 90803

  • Buyers/Sellers/Investors
  • Homes
  • Condos
  • Income Properties
  • 1031 Exchanges
Long Beach MLS Search

Get Your Homes Value

Featured Listings

Contact Us

 

4161 Hathaway 46 Long Beach CA-Circle Area Condo - SOLD - I can sell YOURS too!

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Best Los Angeles Real Estate Agent Blog-Long Beach Real Estate Home

Posted on November 17, 2007 23:48:17 by Laurie Manny Professional Group
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To begin your search for the perfect home or to sell your home in the Long Beach area, begin your journey by calling Laurie Manny at (562) 212-5420.